Immigration Law Blog

 

Selecting an Immigration Attorney

When you are going through the process of becoming an American citizen, there are many legal quandaries you might find yourself facing. Make these issues easier to tackle by working with an experienced immigration attorney. But you might feel overwhelmed when choosing an attorney amid the seemingly endless lists of individual and firm names your searches turn up. How can you know which attorney has the resources and the expertise to effectively help you with your case?

Use the following guidelines to direct your lawyer search. Finding the right attorney to handle your case can be difficult, but it is well worth the time and energy you put into it. Choosing an inexperienced or inadequate attorney can cost you money, time, and put you into a difficult legal position.

Read Reviews of Lawyers

In this day and age, it is easy to find reviews of lawyers and other professionals on the internet. Search Google Reviews, Avvo.com, and any other review website you can find that has information about a prospective attorney from clients who have worked with him or her in the past. You can find out approximately what his or her services cost and how well previous clients felt he or she handled their cases. Do not believe everything you read online, but do take these reviews into consideration when you interview prospective attorneys.

Choose an Attorney who is Responsive

You want to work with a lawyer who cares as much about your case as you do. Lawyers show their dedication to their clients by responding to their phone calls and emails in a timely manner. If you do not receive a response from an attorney or his or her office within 24 hours or so of inquiring, this could indicate that he or she will not be responsive about your case later.

Talk About Money

Although you might have been told that it is rude to discuss money, you need to discuss it with an attorney you are considering hiring. Ask your attorney for an approximate quote for your case before you begin to work with him or her. He or she might not be able to give you an exact price, especially if he or she bills by the hour, but your attorney should be willing to come up with a quote and talk to you about how he or she reached that figure. Be wary of attorneys who are not willing to discuss how they come up with prices or attempt to brush off any questions about money you ask – you could find yourself facing a much steeper bill than you initially imagined.

Work with a Immigration Attorney

To work with an immigration attorney who has the knowledge and experience to help you, contact The Law Offices of Joshua L. Goldstein, P.C. to set up your free legal consultation today. Mr. Goldstein has significant experience working with immigrants in the area and can help you through the legal issue you are facing. Do not wait to make the call – contact The Law Offices of Joshua L. Goldstein, P.C. today.

How to Prepare your Fiancee Visa Online

With the advent of online dating, it has become more common than ever to fall in love with somebody who lives in another country. After traveling across the world to get to know each other better, you might reach the point of deciding that you want to spend the rest of your life with this individual and that you want to spend that shared life here in the United States. To make this scenario a reality, your partner needs to be legally authorized to enter the United States with a Fiancee Visa.

You might have heard disparaging stories about “mail order brides” and people getting married “just for the green card.” Although there is some truth to these stories, they are far from representative of all international couples. If you intend to marry an individual who currently resides in another country and you want him or her to eventually become a citizen of the United States, you need to go through the necessary steps of obtaining a Fiancee/Fiance Visa so he or she can legally enter and remain in this country. To ensure that you complete each step correctly and prevent legal difficulties with this process, work with an experienced immigration attorney.

Coming to the United States to Marry

Once an individual enters the United States using a K-1 visa, he or she must marry his or her sponsor within 90 days. Once the couple is married, the spouse who came on the K-1 visa is granted a two-year conditional green card. If he or she is still in a stable marriage with his or her sponsor spouse once these two years pass, he or she is eligible for a 10-year green card, at which point he or she may begin the naturalization process to become a United States citizen.

How to Complete the Process

Applying for a K-1 visa can be done online through the following steps. It can also be completed by completing physical copies of the necessary forms and mailing them to United States Citizenship and Immigration Services.

  1. The sponsor must file Form I-129F on behalf of his or her foreign partner. This is done in conjunction with Form I-134, an Affidavit of Support;
  2. Once this is approved, the fiance may apply for a K-1 visa through the United States Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs. To do this, he or she must work with his or her local United States Embassy office;
  3. The applicant must then complete the following forms:
  • DS-156, Nonimmigrant Visa Application;
  • DS-156K, Nonimmigrant Fiance Visa Application; and
  • DS-230, Application for Immigrant Visa and Alien Registration.

These forms must also be filed with the United States Department of State. Along with these forms, the applicant must then undergo a medical examination and provide a valid passport, two passport photos, and documentation showing his or her relationship with his or her sponsor;

  1. Once all of the above forms are submitted, the applicant must complete an interview with his or her local United States Consulate or Embassy. Typical interview questions he or she may be required to answer include:
  • How did you meet your fiance?
  • When, if ever, have you met your fiance in person?
  • What type of work does your fiance do? The applicant may also be asked other questions about his or her fiance’s job, such as the city where his or her job is located and his or her position at the company.
  • Have you been to the United States in the past?
  • When are you going to have your wedding?
  • Does your fiance have children? Like with the question above about his or her fiance’s career, an applicant may be required to answer questions about his or her fiance’s children’s names and ages.
  • Why are you getting married in the United States rather than in your home country?

Work with a Los Angeles Immigration Lawyer

If you plan to have your partner come to the United States to marry you and begin your shared life here together, familiarize yourself with the process of obtaining a K-1 visa and determining what you need to do to move forward with this process. Speak with an experienced Los Angeles K-1 lawyer to minimize your chance of facing legal difficulties with this process. Contact The Law Offices of Joshua L. Goldstein, P.C. to schedule your initial legal consultation with our firm today.

Academic and Student Visas in Los Angeles

The United States has some of the best colleges and universities in the world. The University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), Stanford University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and the Ivy League institutions on the East Coast all draw students and academics from around the world with their ample educational and research opportunities.

But for an individual from outside the United States to study at one of these institutions or any other college or university in the United States, he or she must obtain the proper student or academic visa to do so. Visas are the documents that permit individuals to enter and remain in countries where they are not citizens. Having the wrong visa or allowing your visa to expire can cause you to be deported from the United States. Work with an experienced immigration lawyer to obtain the correct visa for your circumstance and to handle any legal issues related to your visa that you face during your time in the United States.

F-1 Visa

An F-1 visa is a visa for students who come to the United States to study at the secondary or post-secondary level. This type of visa remains valid for as long as it takes the student to complete his or her diploma or degree.

To qualify for an F-1 visa, the student must be enrolled in his or her course of study full-time and the school he or she attends must be approved by United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement in compliance with the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS).

M-1 Visa

Students who are interested in completing in non-academic education programs such as language programs, mechanical or technical studies, and culinary programs can come to the United States using an M-1 visa. This type of visa is valid for one year. However, students can extend this type of visa for up to three years if they need this amount of time to complete their coursework.

J-1 Visa

Professors, research scholars, and primary and secondary school teachers may come to the United States using a J-1 visa. This type of visa exists to promote the exchange of ideas, promote collaboration between academics, and share findings across national borders. This type of visa is also known as a Temporary Exchange Visitor Visa.

Individuals who are in the United States on a J-1 visa to teach or conduct research may remain in the United States for up to five years and 30 days.

International medical graduate students may also enter the United States using J-1 visas. Individuals in this group are permitted to remain in the country for up to seven years, with an additional 30 days to prepare to leave the United States at the end of this term. Individuals who cannot complete their medical training programs in seven years may receive visa extensions under certain circumstances.

Individuals who intern at American companies based in the United States may also use a J-1 visa to enter and remain in the country. For an intern, a J-1 visa is valid for up to one year. An intern must be enrolled in a university-level degree program in his or her home country during the internship or complete the internship within one year of his or her graduation.

B-1 and B-2 Visas

This final category of visa is meant for individuals who come to the United States for very short periods. Although this is not usually the type of visa sought by a prospective student or scholar, it can sometimes be the right choice. This type of visa is often sought by individuals who come to the United States to participate in a short, non-academic course such as a conversational language class or those who come to the country to attend an academic conference or convention. A B-1 or B-2 visa is not meant for individuals who plan to earn college credit while in the United States.

Work with a Los Angeles Immigration Attorney

There are many opportunities for students and academics in the United States. Take advantage of these opportunities by studying or researching at one of our esteemed institutions. But to do this, you will need the correct type of visa for your purposes here. Work with Los Angeles student visa lawyer Joshua L. Goldstein to obtain the correct visa and avoid facing legal troubles that can result in you being deported during your time here. Contact our firm today to schedule your initial legal consultation.

Types of Visas Available to Immigrants in Los Angeles

There are many different types of visa available to individuals who are considering emigrating to the United States. If you are considering making this move, it is important that you apply for the correct visa for your circumstance. Otherwise, you can face problems entering and remaining in the United States.

Determining the correct type of visa for you can be difficult and confusing. Make it easier for yourself by consulting with an experienced Los Angeles immigration attorney about which type of visa is right for you. By working with a lawyer who has experience handling the various legal difficulties that new immigrants to the United States can face, you can avoid many of these problems yourself and have an easier time overcoming them if you do find yourself facing one.

There are two types of visas that foreigners can use to gain entry to the United States: immigrant visas and non-immigrant visas. Non-immigrant visas allow individuals to reside in the country temporarily to vacation, attend school, and work. Below are the types of visas available to immigrants entering the United States to live permanently.

I-129F Fiance Visa and Related Visas

This visa is used to bring one’s fiance and the fiance’s children to the United States so the individual and the fiance can marry. It can also be used to bring a spouse and the spouse’s children into the country. A fiance must use a K-1 visa to enter the United States, a spouse must use a K-3, and the fiance/spouse’s children must enter using K-4 visas.

Visas that start with the letter K are meant for spouses and children of United States citizens. When an individual who is not yet a United States citizen but instead a lawful permanent resident wants to bring his or her loved ones into the country to reside, his or her loved ones must use visas that begin with the letter V. A V-1 visa is for the spouse of a lawful permanent resident and a V-2 visa is for his or her child.

H-1B Visa

This type of visa is a visa for professionals in specialty professions who come to the United States to do work for up to three years. Although this is not an immigrant visa per se, an employer may opt to sponsor an employee who is in the country on an H-1B visa for a green card if it feels the individual should continue to reside in the United States permanently.

T-1 Visa

This type of visa is a temporary visa for individuals who are victims of human trafficking. As long as the holder complies with law enforcement in prosecuting the suspects charged with trafficking him or her, the holder may remain and work in the United States. The holder may also apply to become a lawful permanent resident and eventually complete the naturalization process to become a citizen. Children, spouses, parents, and minor siblings of a T-1 holder may also apply for other types of T visa.

Other Visa Types

The other types of visa that are available to immigrants entering the United States are divided into multiple categories. The type an individual may obtain depends on his or her relation to a United States citizen or reason for entering the country. For example, visas numbered IR-1 through IR-5 are for immediate family members of United States citizens, such as their parents and children. SB-1 visas are for permanent resident aliens who left the country and failed to return while their green cards remained viable for reasons they could not control. Certain types of visa are only for individuals coming from certain countries, such as visas numbered F-21 through F-25, those numbered B-21 through B-25, and those numbered FX-1 through FX-3 and BX-1 through BX-3. There are 185 types of visas available to individuals seeking entry to the United States, many of which are only for individuals coming to the country for temporary reasons.

Work with a Los Angeles Immigration Attorney

You might not know which type of visa you need or how you can obtain it to take the next step toward becoming an American citizen. Determine what you need to do by seeking guidance from an experienced Los Angeles visa lawyer. At The Law Offices of Joshua L. Goldstein, P.C., we are dedicated to working with recent immigrants and can help make the visa procurement and immigration processes easier for you. Contact our firm today to set up your initial legal consultation with Mr. Goldstein to learn more about the right type of visa for you.

Credit Building Tips for Los Angeles Residents

Whether you are a recent immigrant to the United States or you have been here for a long time, you can take steps to build positive credit. Having a high credit score will help you with your financial decisions in the future, whether you need to take out a loan to go to college or apply for a mortgage to purchase a home.

Many individuals, both immigrants and native-born Americans alike, do not know how to build their credit. If you are not sure where to start with building your credit, apply the following tips to your everyday life.

Consider a Secured Credit Card

If you do not have sufficient credit to qualify for an unsecured credit card, apply for a secured credit card. A secured credit card is a credit card that an applicant can obtain by putting down a sum of money as collateral with the lender. That sum of money then becomes his or her credit limit. For example, you can apply for a secured credit card with a $500 credit limit with the bank by giving the bank $500 in cash to use as collateral. Because of this collateral, anybody can open a secured credit card and begin building positive credit.

Pay your Bills on Time

Your rent, your utility bills, your credit card bills, and any other bills you have need to be paid on or before their due dates. This is key to building and maintaining positive credit. With credit card bills, it is possible to pay less than what is due, known as the “minimum payment.” This amount is printed on your credit card bill, but do not let yourself get into the habit of only paying the minimum payment each month – allowing your debt to accrue will actually cost you more money in the long run because you will need to pay interest on the balance you carry on your credit card.

Pay your Bills in Full

This goes with the issue above – not only should your credit card bills be paid on time, they should be paid in full. Alongside the issue of having to pay interest on debt accrued, you can also lose track of how much you owe to your lender and reach the point of “maxing out” your credit card.

Become an Authorized User on Another Person’s Card

If possible, you can also build your own credit score by becoming an authorized user on somebody else’s card. This other party could be your spouse or another relative, such as a parent or a sibling. Establish an agreement with this other party beforehand. As an authorized user of their credit card, you are not legally obligated to pay for the charges you make – they are. Discuss how you will reimburse him or her before you become an authorized user.

Work with a Los Angeles Immigration Attorney

Having a strong credit score can help you immensely when you need to take big steps with your finances. For guidance with the legal issues that can accompany these steps or other types of help during the immigration process, contact immigration attorney Joshua L. Goldstein at The Law Offices of Joshua L.Goldstein, P.C. today to set up your free legal consultation.

Using FOIA to your Advantage

In the United States, you have the right to request important information from the federal government under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). As an individual working through the process of becoming an American citizen, you could be required to use this right at some point, especially if you run into legal issues when applying for a work visa or green card. This is because it is possible that there is background information about you in your immigration record that somehow complicates matters like this. Find out what information is available to the federal government by filing a FOIA request with the aid of an experienced Los Angeles immigration attorney. If the United States federal government has information about you that it can potentially use against you, you have a right to know about it.

How to Seek Information Under FOIA

Your immigration file contains information that can be of significant value to you. However, you can also potentially run into issues with obtaining this information if you came to the country before 1982 or if the information in your record has been redacted, or blacked out, because it contains the names of government officials or individuals other than yourself.

Before you start working with an attorney or contacting government agencies, determine which information you need. This will determine the agency with which you file your request and how you file it.

Once you determine the information you need, or if you determine that you need to see your entire immigration file, you or your attorney will make a formal request to the correct agency. This might be the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), the United States Customs and Border Protection (CBP), the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), or the United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). Along with your request, you will need to provide your reason for seeking the information. Your attorney can help you craft this statement and, if necessary, request that the officials handling the request expedite it if you are in a situation where your life, health, or safety is at risk.

Generally, a FOIA request takes five to six weeks to complete, sometimes up to 80 days. When you request that your case be expedited, you can expect to receive your file within 20 days to one month. If you are in need of more immediate information, your attorney can provide a detailed statement of how your life, health, safety, or liberty is at risk to have the request handled in an even quicker manner.

Work with a Los Angeles Immigration Attorney

If you need to file a FOIA request, work with an experienced immigration attorney who can guide you through the steps you need to take and help you understand the information you receive as a result of your request. To start working with immigration attorney Joshua L. Goldstein, schedule your free legal consultation with The Law Offices of Joshua L. Goldstein, P.C., today.

How to Succeed in Los Angeles: Tips for Latinos

Moving to a new country is a significant milestone in your life. After working through the complicated processes of getting your paperwork in order, starting a job, and finding a house or apartment, you will likely find yourself still dealing with the struggles of assimilating to a new culture. Minor issues, such as difficulties related to the language barrier or cultural expectations that are unfamiliar to you, can complicate even simple tasks like applying for a job or conducting a bank transaction.

Keep the following tips in mind throughout the immigration> process. By preparing yourself for the challenges you will face in Los Angeles, you can make them much easier for yourself.

Immerse Yourself in the Latino Community

Los Angeles is a large, culturally-diverse city. It is home to many different ethnic groups. Find other people who immigrated from your home country or those who simply share your language to ask questions and seek advice about any issues you face. You can find others in LA’s Latino community at church or at community events. Make an effort to be an active part of the community, and you will have connections who can help you when you need it.

Save Money

Moving to a new country is expensive, especially moving to a city that has a high cost of living like Los Angeles. If you are not careful with your finances, you can find yourself in debt very quickly. This can make it extremely difficult to build positive credit, which can in turn make it impossible to buy a home in the future, if this is a goal of yours.

Make Sure your Immigration Paperwork is Correct and Up-to-Date

If you are not yet a citizen of the United States, be sure that your necessary paperwork to complete the naturalization process does not lapse. Allowing your files to expire can put you in a difficult position, at best inconveniencing you and at worst, putting you in a position where you could be deported. Work with an experienced immigration attorney to ensure that all of your paperwork is up to date.

Build the Skills you Need to Work in the U.S.

Finding and maintaining a job in the United States is so much easier if you have a strong command of English. Other skills that can help you include computer and customer service skills. Find conversation groups for English learners at your local library or community center. These venues often also provide instruction in other vocational skills, such as computer literacy.

Work with a Los Angeles Immigration Attorney

Adjusting to life in a new city and country is not easy. However, you can lessen the burden by seeking guidance from an experienced Los Angeles immigration attorney. At The Law Offices of Joshua L. Goldstein, P.C., we are dedicated to working with recent immigrants to smooth out the naturalization process and resolve any issues they face. Contact our firm today to discuss the issues you are facing during your free legal consultation.

DAPA hits the Supreme Court: an immigration lawyer’s analysis

For immigration lawyers and millions of people in the U.S. hoping and dreaming for DAPA and other immigration options, this summer’s expected Supreme Court decision will be profoundly life-changing.

Background on the DAPA case

In 2013, the Senate passed S.744, a bipartisan Comprehensive Immigration Reform bill that would have taken steps toward fixing a number of problems with the current immigration system. But Republicans in the House of Representatives killed this bill.

In response, on November 20, 2014, President Obama issued his Immigration Accountability Executive Action. The goal of this was to provide common sense fixes to certain problems and inspire Congress to take more sweeping action.

This executive action included an expansion of the previously implemented Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, and the announcement of a new program called Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA).

These are both deferred action programs that provide eligible individuals with temporary administrative relief from deportation and permission to work.

Expanded DACA

The DACA expansion includes: the elimination of the upper age limit (meaning individuals born before June 15, 1981 who are otherwise eligible, could now apply); the change of entry date from June 15, 2007 to January 1, 2010; and an extended validity period. DACA grants will be for three years, instead of two.

DAPA

DAPA, the new program, is targeted at immigrant parents of U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents and similarly provides a 3-year period of relief from deportation along with permission to work.

To be eligible for DACA, applicants must:

  • Have lived continuously in the U.S. since January 1, 2010;
  • Have been present in the U.S. on November 20, 2014;
  • As of November 20, 2014, had a son or daughter who is a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident;
  • Not have had lawful immigration status on November 20, 2014 or at the time of application for DAPA; and
  • Not have been convicted of certain crimes.

According to the Brookings Institute, 4 millions people may be eligible for DAPA.

Republican launch partisan lawsuit against DAPA

Republicans in Texas and 25 other states brought a challenge to this executive order in federal court, specifically seeking to block the expansion of DACA and the implementation of DAPA. The Republican-led states argued that the President’s exercise of discretion was an unconstitutional overreach.

Then, on February 13, 2016, Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia passed away unexpectedly. With his passing, there are now only 8 justices on the Supreme Court. And Republicans in the Senate have refused to hold hearings and vote on any Obama nominee to replace Scalia.

Possible outcomes of DAPA case

A loss for immigrants

The worst outcome would be a 5-3 decision striking DAPA as an an unconstitutional use of executive authority. Such a decision would have implications far beyond the death of DAPA.

A loss in this case could prevent or limit future presidents from taking action on immigration matters. This outcome would mean that, having blocked legislative action, Republicans would have killed executive action as well. Immigration gridlock would continue for the foreseeable future.

A tied decision would be a loss

With 8 sitting justices, a tie is a theoretical possibility. When a Supreme Court case is decided with a tie, the lower court’s decision stands, but no precedent is set.

In the DAPA case, a tie would reaffirm the conservative Fifth Circuit’s decision, allowing a nationwide injunction on DAPA, but the expansion of DACA to remain in place.

A win for immigrants

The Supreme Court could affirm the legal validity of DAPA. If so, millions of people could begin filing DAPA application.

This is the outcome that the American Immigration Council predicts and the one that I’m hoping for. In this view, the Republican-led states lack standing and the Executive branch has wide discretion to implement and enforce immigration laws. This would also allow future presidents to take executive action on immigration and other contexts.

Immigration Lawyer ready to help with DAPA

Our office will be keeping a close eye on what happens with DAPA. We are hopeful for a positive result, and as soon as we have more information, we will provide it to you on our website and through our newsletter.

Should the Supreme Court uphold executive action on immigration, we will be here to help you prepare and file expanded DACA, as well as DAPA, applications. Come see us to discuss your immigration options. Meanwhile, let’s keep our fingers crossed!

2016: The Year Ahead in Immigration Law

Presidential Election

We’re in an election year and this election will have a big impact on immigration policy. The presidential campaigns are already going strong, and they’ve been pretty unusual and unpredictable so far.

On the Republican side, immigration has become a central issue in their campaigns. A number of the candidates have been speaking to and validating one of the worst characteristics in the American people – xenophobia. The messaging has gone past the point of offensive – it’s become racist.

Donald Trump has called for a ban on all Muslims entering the U.S.; has said Mexicans coming into the U.S. are rapists, criminals and drug dealers; has indicated that he would deport the over 11 million undocumented people in the U.S.; has plans to end birthright citizenship; and has stated he wants to build a “real wall” to keep out immigrants on the U.S.-Mexican border. While Ted Cruz doesn’t go quite as far as Trump in his rhetoric, he supported Trump’s plan to stop all Muslims from entering the U.S.; wants to ban non-Christian Syrian refugees; also wants to build a wall on the U.S.-Mexico border; supports the mass deportation of undocumented immigrants; and has stated he would triple border protection, among other things. Instead of reaching out to immigrants and seeing their potential to add to and improve the United States, the Republican party candidates talk about immigrants using words of prejudice and paranoia.

On the democratic side, the two main candidates, Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders, both support the rights of immigrants as well as the idea of Comprehensive Immigration Reform with a path to citizenship. They’ve spoken out against the hate that the Republican candidates have been selling. They have reaffirmed their support of President Obama’s executive action on immigration reform and have each taken a stand against the recent deportation raids conducted by the Obama administration.

he next President will impact the immigration system in a number of ways – he or she will affect what happens with Comprehensive Immigration Reform, detention centers for immigrant mothers and children, deportation raids, discretionary relief policies, and enforcement priorities. So, the question is, will the American people elect a President who glorifies hate and intolerance, or will the country choose a candidate who will defend the rights of immigrants?

Recently, with Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia’s death, the Presidential election has taken on even more importance for immigration. There is now a vacant Supreme Court seat. President Obama will try to nominate a candidate in the remaining months that he is in office, but he is already getting a large amount of pushback from Republicans. Republicans are urging the Senate to delay the consideration and confirmation of any Supreme Court nominee until the next President is in office. With many important Supreme Court cases in the pipeline, including United States v. Texas (the case that will determine the legitimacy of Obama’s executive action on immigration), the appointment of a new Supreme Court Justice is critical. We’ll provide more updates and information on the United States v. Texas case and Justice Scalia’s potential replacements in our next newsletter!

Five Resume Tips for U.S. Immigrants

One of the first things you will probably do once you are in the United States is look for work. The job search process differs from country to country and once you begin your search in the United States, you might find that you are not receiving calls back or job offers. This could be because your resume does not fit with the standard American resume template or because it contains grammatical, syntax, or spelling errors. For guidance with the job search process as well as with any legal issues you face, work with an experienced Los Angeles immigration attorney.

Proofread

Having a native English speaker proofread your resume is an important step in writing a resume that will help you get the job you seek. Minor grammatical errors can reflect negatively on you and hurt your chance of being hired.

Research American Resume Templates

These can be found on the internet for free. It is important that you write your resume using a template that is appropriate for the type of job you are seeking and that you follow standard American conventions in it. For example, resumes in the United States do not include photographs or personal information like the applicant’s religion or marital status. In fact, it is actually illegal for your employer to ask you to provide this information.

Be Direct

Your resume should be straightforward and list your education, previous positions held, experience, and skills. This is all. It should not exceed one page for junior employees or two pages for senior employees. Employers only look at resumes briefly, so yours should communicate your skillset in a concise manner.

Provide Contact Information

Include your phone number and email address at the top of your resume along with your name. It is important that this information is easy to quickly locate for your employer – again, employers do not spend much time reading their applicants’ resumes, so you want to write yours in a way that it is extremely easy for an employer to determine if he or she wants to contact you, then shows him or her how to do so.

Be Honest

It might be tempting to exaggerate your accomplishments, but do not do this. Be honest about your skills and accomplishments in your resume. During an interview, you will be asked about the information included in your resume – if you cannot answer a question because it is based on inaccurate information, you will likely not be hired.

Work with an Experienced Los Angeles Immigration Attorney

When you are working through the legal aspects of living and working in the United States, such as ensuring that you can work in this country, seek help from an experienced immigration attorney. At The Law Offices of Joshua L. Goldstein, P.C., we are dedicated to working with recent immigrants to smooth out the naturalization process and resolve any issues they face. Contact our firm today to set up your initial legal consultation.

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