Unaccompanied Minors are Crossing the U.S. Border

With the increasing violence in Mexico and Central America, many children are abandoned or become orphans and flee to the U.S. in an attempt to find refuge. They make their way into the country through any means possible, and many of them end up entering illegally. Because of their potential refugee status, many of them end up staying in the country.

In 2013, 47,000 minors were apprehended at the border – 4,000 minors were ordered home – Of the 4,000, only 1,600 were physically sent back It is estimated that up to 8% of all illegal immigrants are unaccompanied minors. That number is double what it was in 2012, and may only grow in the future.

Why Immigrant Minors Need Deportation Attorneys

In 2008, the Bush administration created a requirement that unaccompanied minors have hearing as part of their deportation prcedures. Thousands of minors are subjected to deportation proceedings yearly, and very few of them have legal representation or any legal help. It is inhuman to expect minors to be able to hold their own against the experienced lawyers that the government has hired. Many of the minors are not even aware of their summons. About one-third of all minor deportation cases are carried out without the minor in question ever being present in court. These children would stand a much better chance of being able to remain in the country if they were given access to deportation attorneys. Statistically, the unaccompanied minors are: – 75% males, 25% females – Mostly from Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras – 14-17 years old

The Additional Marriage Fraud Issue

Some of the older children engage in marriage fraud – marrying a U.S. citizen to gain access to a green card. After a couple of years, once they have attained permanent residency, they can separate from the U.S. citizen and live legally in the country. Marriage fraud is defined by its opposite. According to the government, a “true” marriage occurs between two people who are committed to one another and implicitly trust one another, as is demonstrated by living together, uniting their bank accounts, and sharing life together. The couple usually has a lot in common, such as: – Language – Religion – Place of residence – Important celebrations – Children A green card is a kind of salvation for many immigrants. Once they have their green cards, the first step on their journeys towards the American dream is completed, and they can begin rebuilding their lives. From a humanitarian perspective, minor immigration is especially controversial. Every human has dignity and should be able to pursue a full life. Sending children back to their war-torn homes does not accomplish this, even though it may theoretically protect our home country. Having adequate legal representation for minors can help ensure that justice is served fairly.