Category Archives: Immigration Waiver

“My brother filed a visa petition for me. Is there a way to speed up the process of obtain a green card?” A Boston immigration lawyer responds

Boston deportation defense lawyer In a recent immigration consultation, I faced the following situation: A young man entered the United States on a visitor visa and then fell out of status after overstaying. His brother gained U.S. citizenship and then filed an immigrant visa petition, Form I-130, on his behalf. The young man suffered from serious health issues, which were covered by MassHealth. So, with these facts, the family asked me whether there was some way to expedite the process of getting a green card for the young man. In my view, this young man will face at least three major issues when seeking a green card. READ MORE

Our new immigration lawyer video is now live!

Boston Deportation Defense Lawyer The big news today is that my Boston immigration lawyer video is now up and live on Youtube and can be found here. This video couldn't have happened without the help of lots of talented people. But I owe an especially deep debt of gratitude to my former immigration clients--Hakim, Nerlande, Ade, Paxton and Silvia and Nurahmed. Your kind words humble me and remind me why I love being an immigration attorney. Please let me know what you think of my video. And if you want to gain U.S. citizenship, need help with an immigration waiver, representation in deportation hearings in Immigration Court or advice on your immigration options, call me at 617-722-0005. READ MORE

How to get a green card after using someone else’s US birth certificate to get a driver’s license

Boston Green Card Lawyer You just got married--congratulations. Now, based on your marriage to a U.S. citizen, you want to apply for a green card through the adjustment of status process by filing an I-485 with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. But there's one tiny problem: a few years back, you knowingly used someone else's U.S. birth certificate (from Puerto Rico, for instance) to get a Massachusetts driver's license. As an immigration attorney in Boston, I come across this problem frequently. READ MORE

Why I usually don’t recommend Voluntary Departure

When I go to Immigration Court in Boston, my goal is to protect my clients from deportation. I work hard to explore all options, to come up with a winning strategy and to prepare my cases in a way that ensures success. Of course, I want my clients to come away with a green card. But the sad reality is that for some people who must appear in Immigration Court, the facts of their particular cases render them ineligible for any relief from deportation. For such cases, there is simply no way under the current immigration laws to prevent deportation. And, when faced with limited options, many lawyers routinely ask the Immigration Judge for an order of voluntary departure. READ MORE

Your biggest immigration mistake: Marriage fraud

With my experience as a Boston immigration lawyer, I know that many people in Boston and throughout Massachusetts mistakenly believe that marriage to someone with U.S. citizenship is a relatively easy and fast way of obtaining permanent residency or green card status and other immigration benefits. Stop by City Hall in Boston, pick up your marriage certificate and you are automatically entitled to a green card. And it is believed that once you get married, a work permit will arrive soon after you put your immigration petition in the mail. Despite this persistent fantasy, a green card through marriage often proves to be difficult path. For starters, it can be extraordinarily hard to convince U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) at the Boston District Office that your marriage is truly based on a real and bona fide relationship. The immigration authorities will be expecting you to produce extensive documentary evidence that you and your spouse have a shared life that involves love and companionship and that your relationship is not just a sham to obtain permanent residency. At a bare minimum, you can be sure that USCIS will scrutinize all Massachusetts public records to confirm that you and your spouse truly live together in marital union. READ MORE