Category Archives: Citizenship

Citizenship: Why appealing the denial of your N-400 might be a bad strategy

Boston Citizenship Lawyer If you want to appeal the denial of your naturalization application, I might recommend that you not do this. Let me explain why. First some background: if you apply for naturalization by filing Form N-400 and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) denied your application, you should receive a written denial letter explaining why your application was not approved. Along with this denial letter, you should also receive Form N-336, allowing you to request a hearing on the denial of your naturalization application. The N-336 effectively serves as an appeal since it allows you to seek an administrative review of the denial. READ MORE

Want a green card through marriage? How your tax return might help or hurt.

Green Cards, Marriage and Taxes As an immigration lawyer in Boston, I know next to nothing about accounting and tax law. But I do know a lot about how your tax return may impact your immigration case. If you are going through any immigration process, you should expect immigration judges and officers to scrutinize your tax returns. For those who are in the process of applying for a green card through marriage to a permanent resident or to a U.S. citizen or who have filed an I-751 petition to remove the condition on permanent residency, I have 3 tips that may help you: READ MORE

Thinking of sealing or expunging your criminal record? A Boston immigration lawyer says think again

These days, it is not easy to get a job or housing benefits. And it is even tougher if you have a criminal record. To make things easier, criminal lawyers often recommend having your criminal record expunged or sealed. This can be great advice for people seeking work or housing benefits as you will effectively have no criminal record once your criminal record is expunged or sealed. Your Massachusetts CORI criminal history report will show "no adult criminal record," and you can honestly say you have no criminal record when applying for jobs and housing benefits. But sealing or expunging your criminal record does not free you from immigration consequences resulting from a criminal record. A conviction--even if it's been sealed or expunged--can still trigger your deportation. And USCIS (U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services) can deny your green card or citizenship application because of a sealed or expunged criminal record. READ MORE

Tips on Naturalization / Citizenship from Boston AILA Conference

In Boston, Massachusetts, I recently spoke at the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) Conference on Immigration Law. The topic was citizenship and naturalization. Several immigration lawyers from Massachusetts have sent me follow up questions. In response, here are a few tips that will help you successfully handle an application for naturalization, N-400. READ MORE

Just got your Green Card? Some tips from a Boston immigration lawyer.

On behalf of the lawyers in my Boston immigration office, I say congratulations! You just got your green card and are now a lawful permanent resident of the United States! Below are some general tips to avoid future immigration problems and continue on a smooth path towards citizenship. I-751, Petition to Remove Conditions on Residency--Get Ready! If you have a two-year green card (i.e., conditional residency based on marriage), remember that 90 days before the expiration of your green card, you and your spouse, together, will need to file a petition to remove the conditions on your permanent residency. This petition is called an I-751. In order to get your I-751 petition approved, USCIS will expect you to submit extensive documentation to show that the underlying relationship between you and your spouse has been on-going since your I-485 was approved and that you continue to share your lives together. READ MORE

Immigration and Citizenship Documentary on the History Channel

Citizenship, naturalization and the immigration experience will be the subject of a new History Channel featured-film documentary. The immigration film will be called The Naturalized. It is currently being filmed in Boston, Massachusetts and nationally across the United States. The immigration documentary tells the story of several immigrants as they follow their diverse paths to U.S. citizenship. The film highlights aspects of the US immigration system including asylum, marriage, children, deportation, Immigration Court, military service, and denaturalization. READ MORE